10 Hurricane Facts: Debunking the Most Common Myths


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In many parts of the country, particularly coastal areas, hurricanes are inevitable. (© gguy – stock.adobe.com) Severe weather is inevitable. Knowing the facts about hurricanes is important – this way you can make informed decisions to protect your family before, during, and after a storm, unfortunately, there are many misconceptions surrounding hurricanes as there is widespread misinformation on the topic. 10 Myths About Tornadoes – And The Truth Behind Them. The tropics come to mind when many people think of hurricanes, but with regard to location, these storms do not distinguish. (© Satoshi Kina – stock.adobe.com) Myth # 10: Hurricanes only occur in coastal areas, while the drama of a hurricane crashing into a coastal region makes for compelling news on the front page, the effects are felt in the far inland regions. In fact, strong winds are Heavy rains, hurricanes and inland floods can spread hundreds of miles from the coast, leaving behind extensive damage and loss. Just because you live indoors doesn’t mean you’re out of harm’s way – listen to the weather forecast and evacuate. Orientation. (© marchello74 – stock.adobe.com) Myth # 9: Storm Surge is the most deadly part of a Hurricane A storm surge is a wall of water that is pushed ashore as the center of the hurricane moves onto the ground. This image often gets stuck in people’s minds as perhaps the most threatening part of a tornado, and once you imagine a torrent of water heading straight toward you at the speed of a hurricane’s strength, it’s easy to think about the impact of that event and reduce the damage not far away. Rest assured, there will be additional devastation, here’s a reality check: While storm surges can certainly be fatal, more people are already dying from inland floods and rapid floods of rivers and streams because they reduce the power of moving water. You want to be in the attic unit of a tall building during a hurricane. (© oldmn – stock.adobe.com) Myth # 8: Apartment or condominium top floors are safe places to ride a storm Do you think the top of a high-rise apartment or apartment building is the best place to be during a hurricane? Think again. This so-called “vertical evacuation” is a bad idea! Here are the facts: wind speed increases as distance increases, hurricane strength winds can blow windows and cut sides, and rising waters can cause structural damage at lower levels of a building. If that wasn’t enough to convince you to evacuate tall buildings, it could be: high winds and rising water levels make the rescue nearly impossible.


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