7 ways electronics manufacturers are benefiting from automation


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A new concept sweeping the world of manufacturing is timely given labor shortages, supply chain events, and other challenges. It’s called spotlight manufacturing, and it involves automated solutions that run a factory with minimal human input. Electronics manufacturing and automation are a key player in their development and a major user of these technologies. In other words, electronics manufacturers use automation to create devices, which in turn goes back to manufacturing. Automation is showing promising results in the manufacturing sector, but what are some of the realistic implications? How do electronics manufacturers benefit from automated systems? 1. Lower labor costs while increasing coverage Most automation platforms work alongside humans, including cobots, rather than replacing them. Automation in manufacturing plants greatly improves operations, making them more efficient and capable while reducing labor costs. Robots can operate for longer hours, even while exposed to harsh or dangerous conditions. The flip side is that the costs of those who refuse to implement electronics manufacturing and automation solutions will continue to rise. Productivity may be affected, manual labor costs will continue to rise, and labor shortages are likely to persist. The shortage has only gotten worse in the wake of the pandemic. There are more hurdles to face without automation, which calls for a quick rollout. 2. Increased safety robots and automated machines can easily handle dangerous tasks, such as lifting extremely heavy objects or equipment, traversing dangerous areas, dealing with extreme temperatures or bad weather, and more. An automated forklift can, for example, retrieve items stored high in a warehouse and move them to a location easily accessible to workers. Order pickers can do a similar job in a large warehouse to find supplies, tools, and other inventory. Motorized conveyor belts freely move items over short and long distances. Ultimately, this means less pressure on human workers, freeing them up for more complex tasks. 3. Better product quality If you have an automated system that develops or processes the same tasks, more quickly, and with higher accuracy than human workers, the quality of the output will either remain the same or improve. In manufacturing, even the smallest deviations can create major flaws or failures, this is a huge benefit. Automation can help manufacturers achieve a level of standardization and redundancy never seen before. Customers realize this with high quality products or electronics. 4. Faster time to market Fast production leads to faster delivery of goods and items. And in the electronics manufacturing, this is vital to maintaining active relationships between vendors and customers. They depend on the constant flow of parts, devices, and goods. Like water ripple, this speeds up the fans’ access to all other ends along the supply chain, improving everyone’s timing and performance. Machines and robots do not tire, overburden, or slow down unless there is a hardware failure or failure. With a proper preventative maintenance program, these machines and systems can continue to operate almost always. 5. Performing Complex Manual Tasks With small electronics, there are some tasks that humans cannot and never will be able to do. It’s very difficult for any human to hold onto, let alone settle down. However, machines can do this work. Given the recent lack of microelectronics the world is dealing with at the moment, the effects of which we’re still feeling, it makes sense to switch to the lights-out manufacturing model anyway. They can be increased or decreased to match demand, and they will continue operations even after workers go home and turn off the lights – hence the name. 6. Smarter Operations Electronics manufacturing solutions often involve different tasks to meet the stringent standards and requirements of the industry. Machines can be developed to meet these standards and also carry out work in smarter and more efficient ways. Imagine an adaptable machine that can handle different application methods of a matching coating, each of which differs in its level of quality and reliability. Manufacturers may move from one plant to another depending on the project specifications. From project to project or even board to board, the machine can switch its application process to meet product needs, and through a fully automated system. They can also be designed to work with many different materials, from urethane to silicone and parylene resins. This single automatic machine can replace many manual systems. 7. Improving sustainability By streamlining operations and reducing resource costs, it also reduces the company’s environmental footprint. Because automation is designed to use fewer resources and energy than legacy systems, it reduces emissions and generates operational cost savings as well. However, there is another angle to improve sustainability. What some may not realize is that consumers prefer eco-friendly companies that respect green initiatives. In a survey by Futerra, 88% of participating consumers agreed that they want brands to be more environmentally friendly and ethical. It is up to manufacturers and suppliers, who have a direct impact on how materials are ethically sourced, and what kind of impact they have on the environment and surrounding communities. The entire supply chain benefits from green and green improvements, including companies and other suppliers who can claim that everything has been made, supplied, and built using sustainable means. Evolution of electronics manufacturing and automation At some point, more and more electronics manufacturers will prioritize smarter and more efficient operations by adopting automation systems. It will not only be driven by advanced robotics but also more context-aware platforms using machines connected to data about the plant. To get there, we’ll need widespread adoption of these technologies in the first place. Once you look at the benefits the lights industry can offer, it’s no wonder why this is the natural development the industry is heading towards. There will be challenges along the way, including technical, software, and safety-oriented. Intelligent remote monitoring and control systems can help ease the transition, and the necessary infrastructure and applications are being developed at this moment. The manufacture of lights is the ultimate future, and many organizations are already embracing this concept. The big question is: When will you do it? By Emily Newton, industrial journalist and editor-in-chief of Revolutionized


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