How can build on the digital revolution of the pandemic?


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Participants in a Webinar on Construction News, sponsored by Deltek, assessed how the industry can continue to lead the wave of digital transformation resulting from the experiences of the virus crisis “as an industry that we learned that, under pressure, we can actually adapt very quickly,” according to Craig Venn, President The pre-construction section at Henry Boot Construction and part of a panel compiled for a webinar on Construction News focused on digital transformation in the wake of the pandemic. “In my turn, in pre-construction, we’re working across [Microsoft] Teams are developing proposals, progress designs, and collaborating with clients and their supply chain, to reach the contract, ”Finn explains.“ We might have adopted the technology in a way that I think was somewhere around five years before the normal development of our business. ”Other members recount similar experiences. To move forward with our digital transformation plans. “I certainly think the pandemic has forced us to think more creatively and adopt technology on a larger scale and faster than we would have done without it,” says Lydia Walpole, Director of Digital Operations and Performance in Kosten. She points to major changes in governance processes, For example: “We couldn’t walk around and get physical signatures from people, so we had to move to things like DocuSign.” She adds that even “small initiatives have really had a big impact,” citing the introduction of a new invoice processing system. Artificial and machine learning to look at the bill [and] Pick the essentials, rather than someone in the department doing it, she explains. ” Although it sounds really minimal – the ability to turn off about 10 minutes for every invoice being processed – when you scale that down to a complex delivery project, it has Much greater impact. ”But the past year of the digital revolution was not without pitfalls. David Hancock, Director of Construction at the Government Infrastructure and Projects Authority, notes that while the widespread adoption of videoconferencing systems has shown new ways of collaborating up and down the supply chain, it has highlighted The spotlight is also on the fragmented nature of the industry and the lack of standardization. “One day people are on Zoom, the next day they are on Teams or on Google.” “We don’t have a single platform and each works a little differently.” Where do we go from here? The primary question raised by the webinar, sponsored by construction software provider Deltek, was how the industry could learn from the disruptions of the past year and build on it – to study how the industry can improve operations and efficiencies in the future. ”Says Nick Knider, Deltek director of product management. ET: “I think the entire pandemic situation has already given the industry a wake-up call.” “We see organizations become less afraid of change, and faster to adopt. Whether these are the superficial things about conferences [or] They are starting to take a look at their back-end processes. ”“ I think the double whammy of the pandemic and uncertainty about Brexit has encouraged the use of technology, to get closer integration of teams in the early stages of the project’s life cycles, ”says Henry Boot. The overarching goal is to “gain visibility, improve cost and program certainty, at times that are clearly uncertain.” “We see organizations becoming less fearful of change, and quicker to adopt. Whether these are the superficial things about conferences [or] We started looking at their back-end processes. Nick Knider, Deltek Finn adds: “The only reason we’ve been able to afford it over the past year is through the application and use of digital technology. So clearly investing in resilience is key – and that’s now clear. ”Nieder says Deltek’s private research has seen a doubling of the number of companies in the sector that feel they have a clear digital strategy, from just 9 percent to 18 percent over the past year. He jumped as people did [concluded] We have to mature in the digital space, ”notes Nieder.“ If you can be competitive in tough times and live in tough times, when markets are slackening and things get easier, you have a chance to thrive. ”An industry that needs to do more, but despite the trend Improving, Deltek’s numbers show there are still many mountains to climb if only one in five companies had a clear roadmap for digital adoption.Hankock of the IPA notes that many jobs in construction remain untouched by technology, noting that checks do not Still changing in the sector, for example. He argues that the adoption of digital payment systems will boost cash flow across the industry, while blockchain technology could provide security and traceability of payment. He adds that constructions must learn from, and ultimately adopt, The type of backend operations now included throughout the large-scale consumer manufacturing and retailing: [delivery] In the construction industry. ”“ We only do it a week. ”Walpole agrees that progress in the industry will depend on the use of shared data up and down the supply chain. She cites a £ 1.5 billion A14 improvement project, which was completed eight months before Ahead of a joint venture involving Costain, Skanska and Balfour Beatty, as a success story enabled by “Democratic Data.” She explains: “People have convinced us to stop using their spreadsheets, which are saved on hard drives, and [instead to] Physically sharing that data across the project and joint venture partners. It really enabled us to take a look at the software and the commercial data and all those competencies and use those insights to achieve much better performance. ”Walpole stresses:“ If we can really harness the data – not just collect it but use it in an effective way – this is where I can really see the benefits. Huge going forward. ”Finn says Henry Boot Construction is part of his major digital transformation program.“ We rationalized what worked well and kept it and revamped areas of workflows that were ready for improvement. ”We mixed the off-the-shelf solutions together. Local things, to get what we need to run our business sustainably. ”Customer Experience Finn also points to the importance of collaborating with partners on digital adoption, to ensure goals are aligned and systems remain aligned.“ Information was going in both directions, ”he says. Our digital profile is largely about what our supply chain does and what it learns. ”He adds that the program is not just a response to the pandemic but to changing expectations.“ Clients are looking for a service, not just a built-in asset, ”he says. Spot time J that extends beyond the period after occupancy. So we need to be able to demonstrate design intentions. ”Finn notes that the shift to service-oriented offering relies on skills as well as technology, highlighting the need for people who are able to create“ persuasive visualizations and models to support design development, ”as well as project managers who are able to Using technology to support “improved on-site safety, expedited programs and consistent quality levels.” Knider of Henry Boot Deltek agrees, “Our digital transformation program has been greatly influenced by what our supply chain does and learns.” It’s not just about building a structure, it is [client] Experience, ”he says. He adds that success increasingly hinges on“ understanding the competitors you face, and how your customers want to do business. ”Nieder also points to the role digital approaches can play in satisfying customers by improving quality business opportunities. : “One of the statements here has to be the right information, at the right time, to make the right decision.” “It is difficult to know if you’ve done a good job if the information on which I rely is superficial, has changed, or is not tracked through. Given the high cost of rework, he adds, “information management […] As a tool for de-risking is really important. ”Hancock captures this topic, noting that industry rework is often the result of minor incompatibility issues, where the two products do not fit together or work with each other.” By having digital libraries and catalogs , It will be so [warn]: That does not align with that, “he suggests. A more attractive industry, Hancock is also optimistic that increased digital innovation will attract new people to the industry, with increased demand for new skills such as piloting drones.”[That] People who did not previously think about construction will be allowed in. Not only will it allow for better diversity across genders, but also [have more roles for] People with Disabilities, ”he says. Walpole says new people are already coming into the industry with skills related to social value and natural capital. She believes that digital transformation will only accelerate current trends.“ When I entered the industry as a civil engineer, I didn’t necessarily see that My career is moving toward data and the digital road, ”she notes.“ The diversity of skills is already changing, and I had to change the way I think. ”“ When I entered the industry as a civil engineer, I didn’t necessarily see my career heading towards the data and the digital road. The diversity of skills is already changing, and I have had to change my way of thinking, ”says Lydia Walpole, Costin Fein,“ This cat is out of the bag ”now when it comes to the old attitudes of the present, for at least office roles. As a result,“ hiring managers can expand the network geographically, ”he said. He argues. But Finn adds: “I think we still have a lot of work to do, boosting the image of construction as progressive and exciting as a creative industry for people to develop their careers.” In particular, he says that employment practices in construction may be unsuitable for emerging roles He notes that individuals with digital skills “are not necessarily looking where the building industry would traditionally advertise.” In a similar vein, Hancock urges professional organizations in the industry to start “throwing their arms out wider” to embrace people with digital skills rather than skills. Traditional engineering and construction: “Otherwise you understand [the institutions] It’s going to die, because people won’t see it as relevant. ”Nieder agrees, saying,“ For years, we’ve been very focused on transforming people to be digitally smart and I think, where we have to move forward now, is actually making our organizations a home for digital natives. ” Complete the webinar upon request, fill out the form below and submit it:


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