Non-electronic fusion technology reduces dangerous radiation


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Electric Fusion Systems (EFS), a company founded in 2020 with the goal of boosting fusion power, has announced that it has conducted successful trials using non-electronic fusion. The company is experimenting with a new energy technology that does not emit hazardous radiation, a technology that uses non-electronic fusion with lithium + proton, while converting helium + energy products directly into usable electricity. Its inventors and co-founders, Ken Cobb and Ryan Wood, told the EE Times that they have found a safe way to generate fusion chain reactions. The Light Element Electric Fusion (LEEF) reactor was built in miniature to suit a wide range of applications and was constructed following a series of measurements that confirmed fusion reactions through neutron detection, gamma ray spectroscopy, and optics. As observed in the optical spectra, the dense plasma initiates the proton-lithium fusion reactions (Figs 1 and 2). Speakers said their technology is in the patent stage and will provide constant energy without generating pollutants, helping to reduce greenhouse gases sustainably and delaying climate change. They added, “We have set ourselves the goal of not only demonstrating and validating the technology with the scientific community but also licensing intellectual property to strategic industries to accelerate global adoption.” Figure 1: Experiments showing fusion reactions, which were confirmed via neutron devices, gamma rays, and optical spectroscopy data. Helium is generated. (Source: EFS) Figure 2: Plasma (Source: EFS) LEEF does not have a minimum critical mass; It can be produced in small or large sizes in the factory. It has no special nuclear material of concern and no high level radioactive waste. This combination reduces the design, licensing, construction and safety costs of its potential adoption. Neutron fusion In recent years, experiments in nuclear fusion have mainly used two of the simplest reactants, deuterium (made up of one proton and one neutron) and tritium (one proton and two neutrons), both of which are isotopes of hydrogen. The fusion reaction itself, which produces a helium nucleus (two protons and two neutrons) and a neutron, occurs in “young” stars at the beginning of their life cycle. Under experimental conditions, the choice of these elements is determined by the feature of the reaction rate; That is, the probability that the two components lead to the process. However, this reaction produces an intense stream of highly energetic neutrons, which pose a significant radioactive hazard, and therefore must be protected by a thick concrete shield surrounding the reactor. Recent advances in laser technology and a deeper understanding of laser-plasma interactions and laser-accelerated particle beams have opened new paths for achieving fusion fuels based on “non-electronic” nuclear reactions that produce less high-energy radiation. For EFS, the lithium-proton fusion reaction is the best option, because it generates virtually no neutrons (and thus supports non-electronic fusion) or radiation and has a high energy output. A proton is a hydrogen atom stripped of its electron. Lithium is a light, non-radioactive element used in lithium-ion batteries and many other industrial applications. As the speakers pointed out, the combination of lithium and hydrogen is a clean and abundant fusion fuel cycle, making it the ideal fuel source for EFS’ commercial fusion solution. Figure 3: Fusion Energy Acquisition Factor (Source: EFS) The EFS fusion reactor believes it has achieved a new solution in fusion physics by using cyclic induction to harness the energy of fusion chain reactions as an electric arc passing through the fuel plasma, resulting in the direct conversion of electricity. Plasma density is a key factor and determines the efficiency of the system. The EFC defines such a system as a “fusion plasma converter,” with fuel being one of the keys, which must be very dense. The EFS says this will allow the cost of electricity to be reduced by a factor of 10. “In the US, costs are about $100 per megawatt-hour (or 10 cents per kilowatt-hour), and the advent of new clean technologies may reduce these costs,” the technology speakers said. Our prototype is a non-electronic fusion reactor capable of providing tens of kilowatts of power, but which can be scaled up to megawatts. The plasma transducer is about 90% efficient at converting magnetic pressure into electricity. Figure 4: LEEF Cycle (Source: EFS) Figure 5: Performance Test Prototypes (Source: EFS) EFS fuels operate in the supercritical fluid state. Ion temperatures are in the order of megaelectronvolts, which leads to large chain reactions during each cycle Fusion This process is cyclical (hundreds to thousands of Hz) and the fusion energy is extracted in each cycle through magnetic induction (Figs 4 and 5).When fusion reactions occur in a chain reaction state, they create explosions of charged particles that are electromagnetically coupled to the oscillating magnetic field of the reactor, Which then turns into electricity. Basically, it’s a gain transformer that uses fusion plasma as its core. This allows us to use efficient power electronics to synthesize the EMF and then regulate it as a switching power source, so the direct output conversion can be, for example, 800 VDC or 35 kVAC.” They added, “We have an arc that goes through these electrodes and expands with the fusion reactions and then creates magnetic pressure and electromagnetic force that we pick up in the primary plasma transducer.” for normal. Then, once you put the power into the coil, you can use typical power conversion electronics to deliver power to any AC or DC voltage and frequencies, but at the same time, you need some control electronics to modulate the interactions. Basically, what we do is use the nature of plasma fusion to directly couple to the magnetic field and transfer energy (an electromagnetic force) to the surrounding inductor coils. Hence, we have a gain primary transformer driven by burning lithium, and that’s really the power source we’re generating.” It’s straight hot fusion – E = mc2. Magnetic and electric fields, plasma physics, pressure confinement, electromagnetic pulses, and energy extraction can combine through inductive coupling. , combined with electrical engineering solutions, to finally provide new opportunities for fusion physics. Please visit EE Times for the full article.


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