Power Box Board helps students better understand Si and SiC technology


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We know that technical education requires not only theoretical knowledge but also practical knowledge and practical experience for students to understand deeper concepts at the department level. 2 Labs actually help students understand topics such as circuit design concepts. Tools used to teach electronics such as Power Pole Board3, 4, and Blue Box5 are useful for understanding the basics of power electronics, but cannot be used to teach new electronics concepts, as it has a lifespan of around 15 years. The Power Pole Board consists of modules that can be used to teach the basics, such as DC / DC converters, but the parameter related to AC cannot be performed on them, while the Blue Box supports the AC 5 parameter but it is also nearly 20 years old – the old board, therefore, cannot be made Laboratory tasks related to modern concepts of electronics on it. To teach modern technology related to wide bandgap devices and integrated circuits, it is necessary to create a new learning board. This article introduces an educational new power board called Power Box.1 This board consists of Si and SiC based devices, which helps students to understand the advantages of modern semiconductor devices as well as support all DC and AC coefficients. The new technology offers functions such as smaller size, multiple functions, and greater accuracy. The proposed board also has different modules, allowing to create custom circuits and learn the effect of gate impedance on switching frequency. 1 This article will discuss the design and features of the Power Box. A prototype will also be shown with circuit diagrams to analyze the efficiency and performance of the proposed power box. Blue box approach The Energy Box uses the Blue box approach rather than the black box approach. In a black box approach, a director is proposed, and students are asked to design a circuit to produce the proposed outputs. In the blue box method, instead of the output, students are provided with an electrical circuit inside the transformer to build, providing them with deeper knowledge about circuit design. 6, 7 This not only increases students’ participation, but allows them to better understand power fundamentals electronics and the behavior of components and devices. Under 8 different conditions, which helps students to prepare for the industry. Power Electronics introductory labs provide very little knowledge about wide band gap devices and SiC based devices, resulting in a lack of knowledge about the advantages of SiC devices over regular Si devices, such as fast switching, low switching losses, high efficiency, and high breakdown voltage. Design details Figure 1 shows the prototype power box. As we can see from the figure, the Power Box is divided into four parts. The first part is the switch block, which contains normal Si devices, while the second part contains another switch block with SiC MOSFETs. This helps students analyze the behavior of the two devices side by side. Students can switch between the two blocks using the two independent toggle switches. 1 A pulse width modulation (PWM) circuit is also included for switching MOSFETs, and the switching frequency can be adjusted with a potentiometer. Another potentiometer is used to adjust the duty cycle. PWM can also be controlled by an external signal from the signal generator. After PWM, there is a digital logic circuit, which is used to increase the frequency and change the working ratio. The Power Box is powered by 12 VDC and the board can handle 600 VDC and 10-A current, but in laboratories, due to safety measures, the voltage is kept below 60V while the current value is around 2A. The frequency range is between 750Hz and 250Hz. 1 Figure 1: Prototype of a Power Box PWM Circuit Figure 2 illustrates the circuit diagram of a PWM Controller. Three 5k ohm voltmeters are used to control the working ratio. To configure the generated PWM frequency, a 50 k أوم voltmeter is used with a switch to change the capacitance on the CT pin. An onboard BNC jack is also included to control the PWM via an external signal. Logic integrated circuits are also installed on the PWM controller. The generated PWM passes through these integrated circuits: to divide a single signal into two signals to produce a 180-degree phase shift between the two signals to add the final time after passing through the logic integrated circuits, the signal then arrives at the three-way switch, which enables three settings: two identical signals With a phase difference of 180 ° two signals with a specified phase and time difference Figure 2: A SiC gate motor for a PWM control circuit Figure 3 shows the circuit diagram of a SiC gate motor. The use of SiC MOSFET means a complex gate drive circuit, where SiC MOSFET provides a lower shunt conductor, resulting in higher operating voltage and lower gate source voltage. The SiC MOSFET chosen for the power box has a Vgs (on) of 20 V, while the Vgs (off) is –5 V. To match this requirement, an isolated power supply is chosen to provide a higher switch and a lower switch – from the mains to the circuit. The traditional gate driver IC for Si devices also needed to be changed, as it was not able to support the potential difference caused by the new power supply. A switch is also inserted into the gate driver circuit, which enables the student to change the gate resistance via the potentiometer to observe its effect on switching frequency. Figure 3: SiC Gate Motor Circuit Snubber Circuit As Si and SiC MOSFETs exhibit a wide range of switching behavior, the design of snubber circuits becomes more complex. Numerous tests were carried out on different breathing circuit designs, and it was concluded that the best breathing circuit is an RCD breathing apparatus, as it reduces sudden voltage surges for different loads. One drawback associated with the RCD is the power loss for high power applications.9 Since the Power Box is an instructional board that will be used in the lab, the disadvantage of the RCD will not operate, like the labs are made at low voltage. The features go beyond the suggested Power Box in apps compared to the Power Pole and Blue Box. It can be used in all basic applications such as DC / DC converters, AC / DC rectifiers, and AC / DC converters. Students can easily switch between SiC and SiC devices and compare their switching behavior for different applications. In terms of pricing, the Power Box is in the middle, as it is more expensive than the Blue Box but costs less than the Power Pole Board. Suggested board size is 33% larger than the blue box, Si and SiC modules have been added to it, 1 but smaller than Power Pole board. Conclusion This article discusses a new teaching board, “Power Box”, and its advantages over traditional boards. The Power Box can be used with all basic DC and AC lab demonstrations. The coefficient will be the same as the blue box; The difference is the use of new technology in panel design. The new technology has brought advantages like smaller size, lower cost, and higher usability. The use of SiC devices has added additional benefits such as high switching speed. It also allowed students to understand the gate driver circuit by introducing an adjustable gate resistor. References 1PowerBox: Modern Power Electronics Teaching Toolbox Using Si Devices and SiC Trenton Kilgore, Student Member, IEEE; Alastair Thurlbeck, Student, IEEE; Yo Kao, Member, IEEE; Ted Breakin, Senior Member, IEEE; Zhoushan Li, Member, IEEE; Philip T. Keren, Fellow, IEEE. 2G. G. Karady, “List of Laboratory Education in Electric Power Engineering Education,” in Proc. IEEE Power and Energy General Meeting, 2008, Pages 1-3. 3Vishay Custom Magnetics. (2015). Power electronics lab assembly. https://media.digikey.com/pdf/Data%20Sheets/Vishay%20Dale% 20PDFs / 75136.pdf. Accessed Jul 15, 2019. 4Power Electronics Lab User Guide. (2019). First edition. (E-book) University of Minnesota, pp. 1-51. http://people.ece.umn.edu/groups/power/labs/pe/pe_manual.pdf. Accessed July 15, 2019. 5 Design Document: FET 2002 Control Box Redesign. (2003). First edition. (E-book) Urbana, IL: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Pages 1 to 33. https://ceme.ece.illinois.edu/files/2014/06/DD00003-001-FETBox-2003.pdf. Accessed July 15, 2019. 6R. Balog and PT Kerin, “Modular Power Electronics Teaching Lab,” Proc. 34th IEEE Annual Power Electronics Professionals Conference, 2003, pp. 932-937. 7 p. T. Kerin, “Broad-based Laboratory for Power Electronics and Electrical Machinery,” Proc. IEEE Power Electronics Specialist Conference, 1993, pp. 959-964. 8N. Mohan et al., “Restructuring the first cycles in power electronics and electric motors that integrate digital control,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, Vol. 18, v. 1, pp. 429-437, January 2003. 9a. R. Vaz and FL Tofoli, “Practical Design of a DC-DC Buck Converter Using RCD Rubber,” Proc. Brazilian Energy Electronics Conference (COBEP), 2017, pages 1-6. .


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