Real-time control and high-precision data acquisition in industrial design


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Texas Instruments (TI) has expanded its family of high-speed data converters with a new family of eight analog-to-digital SAR (SAR) analogue converters (ADCs) that enable high-speed data acquisition in industrial environments. Aimed at real-time control challenges in industrial systems, the ADC3660 SAR ADC with 14, 16, and 18-bit resolution with sampling speeds ranging from 10 to 125 MSPS claims to reduce power consumption by 65% ​​and latency by 80% compared to competitive hardware. During the press conference, Matt Hahn, Product Line Manager, High Speed ​​Data Converters at TI, highlighted the need for real-time control in industrial systems, and thus the importance of the new ADC 3660 not only in real-time control but also in the world of precision and speed. high. Until now, engineers designing industrial systems have had to choose between different compromises in terms of noise and lower power consumption—a particularly difficult decision for those designing battery-powered devices that require accurate data acquisition. Han noted that the ADC3660 family aims to address these trade-offs with eight SAR ADCs at 14, 16, and 18-bit resolutions at sampling rates ranging from 10 to 125 MSPS. Real-time digital control Increased precision in high-speed data management is meeting the growing industrial need for real-time control. Here, the ADC operates in a complex system to respond to rapid changes in voltage or current and help prevent costly damage to vital components in power management systems. “When you talk about real-time control, you think of something momentary,” Han said. “So in a real-time control system, rapid control is often needed where high accuracy and speed are important, such as in thermal imaging cameras, network infrastructure, power quality analyzers, etc.” Figure 1: Enabling real-time control using digital control loops (Source: TI) As shown in Figure 1, in digital control, there are actually four main pieces. We have a series of analog circuits in series Rx that brings data to the ADC and is processed by an FPGA or MCU in real time or even a DSP. This information is taken and translated back to the upload by the DAC as a reverse process. “The total time it takes for this to happen is measured by what we call latency,” Han said. “So in the past, low latency was something that could only be enabled by an analog controller. Because you weren’t necessarily limited by the sampling rate of the ADC or even the noise of the ADC to make an accurate measurement.” TI’s new ADC delivers nanosecond latency, providing not only real-time control but also design flexibility. “What allows the DCU to be flexible is the programmability of the ADC3664,” Han said. The scalability and real-time programmability allow the end designer to customize a system that can adapt to multiple applications simply by changing a few parameters in the program, Han said. “This results in flexibility in the final design and a significant cost savings for the end customer.” SAR ADCs Hann highlighted a few devices in the new ADCs family, which consists of eight end-to-end compatible devices in single-channel or two-channel configurations, ranging from 10 to 125 MSPS in 14, 16 and 18 bit resolutions. Depending on the device, the family can deliver up to 80% lower latency for real-time control and best-in-class dynamic range with minimal power consumption, plus integrated features and high sampling frequencies make design a breeze. He said. “ADC3683 is an 18-bit 65M sampling that improves noise performance in narrow-frequency applications such as portable radios with a signal-to-noise rate (SNR) of 84.2 dB and a noise spectral density of 160 dB/Hz. Furthermore It consumes less power, with an average of 94 megawatts per channel,” said Han. Figure 2: ADC3683 block diagram (Source: TI) The ADC3664 is another variant that offers low latency (1 hour, 8 ns) and helps protect critical components and increase instrument accuracy in applications such as semiconductor manufacturing systems. The family’s ultra-low latency enables high-speed digital control loops in a variety of industrial systems to more accurately monitor and respond to voltage and current spikes, increasing instrument accuracy in applications such as semiconductor manufacturing systems. The high sampling rates and integrated features of the ADC3660 family help designers reduce the number of components in their systems. For example, the ADC3683 allows for oversampling, which drives harmonics away from the desired signal. This allows designers to reduce the complexity of the anti-aliasing filter and the number of components in the system by up to 75%. Other family features that reduce design complexity include on-chip destruction options that allow designers to easily remove unwanted noise and harmonics in the system and increase SNR and error-free dynamic range by up to 15 dB. These decimation options and complementary metallic semiconductor (CMOS) interface allow designers to use ADCs with ARM-based or digital signal processors instead of field-programmable gate arrays, which can help reduce system cost. Please visit electronic products for more information.


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