Spring trench collapses, leaving 6 dead


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Six workers died in trench collapses and four workers were rescued after being partially buried in caves last spring across the country. Cave workers died in Colorado, New York, North Carolina, Utah and Texas between March 20 and June 20. March 22 – David Valenzuela Pavila, 42, of Spring Valley, New York, died in a 10-foot-high trench in Woodbury, New York, according to the Woodbury Police Department. Police said Valenzuela Pavela was buried when the trench he was in did not contain a trench box. The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration has conducted an open inspection of Amerex Construction of New City, New York, on the matter. April 5 – The body of Jason Villalobos, 21, is recovered from Houston after a six-hour operation in Corpus Christi, Texas. Villalobos was working on a fiber-optic project in a 10-foot-deep trench when it collapsed. OSHA has an open inspection of the SS Construction of Houston on this matter. April 16 – Louis M. Curtis-Corea, 50, of Thornton, Colorado, was in a 25-foot-deep trench in Jonestown, Colorado, during a residential sewer pipe installation. When the rescuers arrived, three workers were trying to save Curtis Correa. Water was gushing into the trench, and Curtis put Correa in the mud under the water, according to the Loveland Fire Rescue Authority. The trench was 30 feet wide and directed down to about 5 feet at the bottom. Workers were using a pump to remove water from the trench, but at some point, the trench partially collapsed from the bottom. About 60 rescuers were at the site. They used a dump truck and pumps to remove water from the trench for the seven-hour recovery process. OSHA has an open inspection of Dunaway Excavating of Strasburg, Colorado, on this issue. May 4 – A worker from Stamford, Connecticut, died in a trench collapse in Mamaroneck, New York, at a residential construction site. He was buried in the dirt in a trench 10 feet deep. No further details available May 19 Shane Sharp, 37, of Taylorsville, North Carolina, was found partially covered in asphalt and dirt after the 10-foot-deep trench he was in collapsed. Workers were replacing the drain line in a commercial parking lot when the cave occurred. OSHA has an open inspection of Barnes Backhoe – Grading of Taylorsville on this issue. June 15 – A worker dies in a trench collapse in Southern Jordan, Utah. Another worker was in the trench but managed to escape. The trench was on a residential construction site. No more details available Cave survivors Rescues from trenches are difficult, time-consuming and dangerous and often become recovery operations because rescuers cannot safely reach the buried workers in time Often, travelers trying to rescue a buried fellow can get stuck in secondary collapses. Before rescue workers enter the trench, they first make sure it is secure by shoring or other methods, and although the worker may not be completely buried, there is still a risk of pressure, which can block circulation and cause tissue death. And when blood starts circulating again, it can lead to organ failure. Last spring, at least four workers were rescued from the caves: APRIL 7 – A worker was buried to the waist in a trench in Lower Potsgrove, Pennsylvania, after one of its walls collapsed. It took rescuers over an hour to remove it. More than a dozen fire and rescue agencies participated in the attack. OSHA has an open inspection of the H&K group in Skippack, Pennsylvania, regarding this matter. April 20 – It took several hours for firefighters in Asheville, North Carolina, to rescue a worker buried to his chest in a collapsed trench. They first dug up the dirt to take the pressure off his chest. He was later taken in stable condition and taken to hospital. May 7 – A worker’s foot is trapped for four hours in a trench collapse on Mercer Island, Washington. He was in a narrow trench 9 feet deep. He was taken to the hospital and is in stable condition. Several agencies responded to the rescue and used specialized equipment due to the confined nature of the trench. A dump truck has also been deployed. May 27 – A worker is rescued from a collapsed trench 12 to 15 feet deep in South Portland, Maine. Workers were digging all night at an intersection when the collapse occurred. Coworkers exposed him and firefighters used a ladder truck to get the worker out, according to the Portland Press Herald. He was reportedly conscious and alert when he was taken to hospital. OSHA has an open inspection of Dearborn Brothers Construction in Buxton, Maine, on this issue.


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